Max Baker-Hytch

Dr Max Baker-Hytch teaches the philosophy component of the OCCA One Year Program and leads the OCCA Doctoral Fellows program. He has spoken at universities across Europe and North America, and has published in scholarly journals.

Dr Max Baker-Hytch is Senior Academic Tutor at OCCA The Oxford Centre for Christian Apologetics. Separately from his role at OCCA, he is Tutor in Philosophy at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford University and is a member of the Faculty of Philosophy at Oxford University.

Max holds a DPhil (PhD) in Philosophy from Oxford University. His doctoral dissertation examined the philosophical implications of recent accounts of the causal origins of religious belief. Max went on to hold a postdoctoral research fellowship at Oxford, as part of the Templeton-funded New Insights and Directions in Religious Epistemology project, and a research fellowship at the University of Notre Dame’s Center for Philosophy of Religion.

His research interests lie at the intersection of analytic philosophy of religion and epistemology. Max has published in scholarly journals on such topics as divine hiddenness, religious diversity, etiological challenges to moral and religious beliefs, the nature of rationality and knowledge, and methodological issues concerning the emerging field of analytic theology. Downloadable versions of some of his scholarly publications can be found here: https://oxford.academia.edu/MaxBakerHytch.

Max teaches the philosophy component of the OCCA One Year Program and leads the OCCA Doctoral Fellows program. He has spoken at universities across Europe and North America and has participated in several public debates including on Premier Radio’s Unbelievable show. Max also speaks at a popular level on a range of topics related to the rationality of belief in God as well as the historicity of the Gospels, a topic on which he and his colleague Calum Miller have written a forthcoming popular-level book.

Max lives with his wife and two daughters in Oxford. In his spare time he enjoys playing around with guitars and keyboards in his home studio.

The real problem with human beings is not that we aren’t smart enough or strong enough, but that each of us has a tendency to put ourselves ahead of others. That’s what sin is.

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